The FYI and that tree

Kindergarten registration, perhaps particularly for a child with a disability or handicap, is not for the weak at heart. I hesitated writing this post because I know this has been a redundant topic and I fear that it comes across as only negativity regarding Zack and our journey. Not my intention at all.

It was supposed to be 15 minutes of a quick screening, I was told. We were excited to finally have one of us┬ásee the inside of the “home school” for the kids (where Zack will attend is still up in the air). After our issue with the registrar’s office last month, I found my anxiety level in the last few days rising steadily. Still, I kept my chin up and my mind open and drove the mile and a half to the large brick building.

We took a photo out front and marched up the front steps, all three of us counting together. We were greeted in a lobby filled with Cat in the Hat cut-outs and smiling children.

And then we were given a packet, instructions for a six-part circuit in the gymnasium and, right on cue, Zack ran down the hallway and wouldn’t come back to me, smack in the middle of a handshake with the principal. The first stop after scooping him up and talking about danger and listening, was simple — letters and colors and shapes — the table where he’d impress and prove wrong the challengers.

He didn’t speak a single word. Not his favorite color or the first letter in his name. A Kindergarten teacher at the school shrugged it off and told me it was no big deal and sent us to the next station. He wouldn’t even sit down at the table where all he had to do was match letters and name the item in a picture. At the nurse’s station, a middle-aged woman asked questions about immunizations and I don’t know if she didn’t make eye contact because I was already holding back tears or if the tears came because I felt her give up.

At the top of Zack’s checklist, an hour later and now with “yes”s and “no”s alike, was a tiny yellow Post-It. “FYI” in large block letters. And the name of the LifeSkills class in another school miles away. At least they were kind enough to add a question mark, but by now, visions of a dismal, windowless room in the basement were already popping into my mind. The other school, the guidance counselor said as we left, ink still drying on our packet, “could be lovely, too.”

On the way out, Zack counted to 12 on his own and pointed to my Jeep and said “Momma’s white car.” I cried in that parking lot while the kids ate their gifted lollipops and attached stickers to their shirts.

I hated Down Syndrome more than ever before in that parking space under a flowering tree. I never even thought Kindergarden would be a blip on our radar this year. And now, the same strangers who assured us that ZMan could thrive in an elementary school, maybe even a regular classroom, go ahead and go through the process, what’s the worst that could happen? — Those strangers already counted him out or counted on this. I mean, FYI.

It’s not the recommendation that he does X or Y; it’s the getting there wondering if you’ve done enough.

The worst that could happen? This. This parking space and the phone call to my husband. The helplessness and the hopelessness. The reminder that everything is a battle and some battles can’t be absorbed by a lollipop and his Momma.

My friend is wise and calming and she told me today to “try not to borrow trouble.”

So I lay my worries on the ground and cover them up and plant something beautiful in their place. We will cherish and nurture the good that comes out of this mound of dirt and we will see where it takes us in these next few months. And we will grow. Perhaps into a flowering tree to harbor fears and shelter worries.

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We grow some flowers

I am certain I’m jinxing us but I’ll say it anyway: I think we are healthy again. After two rounds of a flu-like illness simultaneously battling two rounds of a stomach bug, we bought stock in Lysol, lost school days, got our schedules out of whack for nearly eight days and most definitely lost Mommy’s last shred of sanity. 

But today, my kids laughed their belly laughs and fell back into their old habits. Zack got on his lil van to school and even returned home on it as opposed to sick in my backseat. 

We spent hours outside yesterday, blowing bubbles and playing games and in that helpful sunshine we were all put together again. 

A tentative text to Zack’s aide asking about his day returned a “He did great!” and gave me such relief. 

And while pretending to put her animals to bed, Addie called me. 

“You’re my best friend, Momma.”

When I asked her why, she told me because “We grow some flowers and you take me to adventures.”

One of my momma friends and I were talking about how much you take healthy kids for granted until they are down for so long. And we also take for granted belly laughs and adventures and growing flowers and. Blowing bubbles. 

So here’s another restart, with healthy babies and happy momma. 

   

     

And eat it, too

I heard Zack making some noise right on cue this afternoon, signifying the end of naptime.

I slugged one more sip out of my coffee mug, put the laptop away and did a little stretch at the bottom of the stairs. As I rounded the corner on the landing, I stifle a laugh when I see two mismatched Zack socks that have been pushed out from under his door.

I open the door and hear him singing.

He is sitting at the bottom step to his Zook Nook reading and comfy area of his closet, singing Happy Birthday.

He sees me, smiles, and yells, “Happy Birthday, Momma!” (It’s not my birthday, sidenote.)

I tell him thank you and make sure he is still wearing pants. (Pants, no; diaper, yes)

He holds out his hands to me like he’s cupping a secret.

“Present, momma.”

I pretend to open a wrapped box and exclaim my love for this invisible gift.

I ask him what it is as we walk down the stairs.

“Cake!” he says with a smile. “Yum!”

He pretends to rub his belly and I rub mine.

There are a thousand moments like this a week.

A thousand times I pinch myself or say a quiet “thank you” to the stars or tuck away a memory to retrieve in the middle of a horrendous diaper explosion, stomach bug, temper tantrum or begging for a snack.

A thousand times I feel like I shall have my cake and eat it, too. Even if it’s invisible. Especially if its invisible.