The FYI and that tree

Kindergarten registration, perhaps particularly for a child with a disability or handicap, is not for the weak at heart. I hesitated writing this post because I know this has been a redundant topic and I fear that it comes across as only negativity regarding Zack and our journey. Not my intention at all.

It was supposed to be 15 minutes of a quick screening, I was told. We were excited to finally have one of us see the inside of the “home school” for the kids (where Zack will attend is still up in the air). After our issue with the registrar’s office last month, I found my anxiety level in the last few days rising steadily. Still, I kept my chin up and my mind open and drove the mile and a half to the large brick building.

We took a photo out front and marched up the front steps, all three of us counting together. We were greeted in a lobby filled with Cat in the Hat cut-outs and smiling children.

And then we were given a packet, instructions for a six-part circuit in the gymnasium and, right on cue, Zack ran down the hallway and wouldn’t come back to me, smack in the middle of a handshake with the principal. The first stop after scooping him up and talking about danger and listening, was simple — letters and colors and shapes — the table where he’d impress and prove wrong the challengers.

He didn’t speak a single word. Not his favorite color or the first letter in his name. A Kindergarten teacher at the school shrugged it off and told me it was no big deal and sent us to the next station. He wouldn’t even sit down at the table where all he had to do was match letters and name the item in a picture. At the nurse’s station, a middle-aged woman asked questions about immunizations and I don’t know if she didn’t make eye contact because I was already holding back tears or if the tears came because I felt her give up.

At the top of Zack’s checklist, an hour later and now with “yes”s and “no”s alike, was a tiny yellow Post-It. “FYI” in large block letters. And the name of the LifeSkills class in another school miles away. At least they were kind enough to add a question mark, but by now, visions of a dismal, windowless room in the basement were already popping into my mind. The other school, the guidance counselor said as we left, ink still drying on our packet, “could be lovely, too.”

On the way out, Zack counted to 12 on his own and pointed to my Jeep and said “Momma’s white car.” I cried in that parking lot while the kids ate their gifted lollipops and attached stickers to their shirts.

I hated Down Syndrome more than ever before in that parking space under a flowering tree. I never even thought Kindergarden would be a blip on our radar this year. And now, the same strangers who assured us that ZMan could thrive in an elementary school, maybe even a regular classroom, go ahead and go through the process, what’s the worst that could happen? — Those strangers already counted him out or counted on this. I mean, FYI.

It’s not the recommendation that he does X or Y; it’s the getting there wondering if you’ve done enough.

The worst that could happen? This. This parking space and the phone call to my husband. The helplessness and the hopelessness. The reminder that everything is a battle and some battles can’t be absorbed by a lollipop and his Momma.

My friend is wise and calming and she told me today to “try not to borrow trouble.”

So I lay my worries on the ground and cover them up and plant something beautiful in their place. We will cherish and nurture the good that comes out of this mound of dirt and we will see where it takes us in these next few months. And we will grow. Perhaps into a flowering tree to harbor fears and shelter worries.

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Normalcy and the foyer

The other day, Zack returned to school after missing an entire week of school due to snowdays and a cold. It marked the EIGHTH week in a ROW that he didn’t go to his Pre-K program all four scheduled days in a week.

We did the best we could do with cabin fever and crafts, coughs and lots of coffee.

But there’s something about rounding that corner, you know? Everyone has their corner. For a tired, exhausted, overwhelmed mom of two cranky and bored kids in a miserably cold winter, that corner was the bus pulling in front of the house Monday morning and a smile creeping across both my face and Zack’s.

Even better than that bus pulling away and the calming sense of routine returning, was its return a few hours later.

Zack was smiling when I opened the door and yelled, “Call Uncle Brick!” which made me laugh so hard. He insisted on walking to the door, not being carried, and wanted to open the mailbox to check for “Momma letters”, too. I was so giddy with happiness. And it was in the high 40s that day, too! Hooray!

Addie was at the front door, blowing raspberries against the glass. Zack met her on the other side and blew drool all over the window, too. (Note to self: You still haven’t cleaned all those prints, oops!)

We opened the door and she squealed a thousand exclamations.

“Zack, you’re home!”

“I’m so glad you’re home!”

“Come into my playroom.”

And then, she grabbed the zipper on his coat, which he had been struggling with, and said, “I help you?”

He smiled and nodded, leaned over and kissed her forehead.

I froze.

The newspaper in my hand, only one boot off.

She pulled the zipper down, he tore the red and black jacket off and threw it across the room. They both laughed. I couldn’t help but giggle, too. And then he wrapped his arms around her.

“Home, Addie.”

Turned to me: “Schnack, Momma, please!” (Typical, haha)

And she returned the hug. A little ten-second bear squeeze. I still only have one boot on.

And she held out her hand, which he grabbed. And they marched into the living room and sat down at the couch together.

I heard Addie ask him if he was a good boy at school and that laughter from my throat made me take the other boot off, grab the backpack and the thrown jacket and walk back into normalcy, happiness and the appreciation of the little things.

Where we are

One of my resolutions on the 1st (I wrote a long list this year) was to blog more often. I’m hoping we can all pretend that the first two weeks of the new year without a post never even happened and we can start working on this resolution from here on out, OK?

One of the reasons we haven’t had a blog post is because we’ve been so busy (Wendy’s photography business and Mary Kay team, visiting family, meetings with Zack’s school and much more). The other reason why we haven’t had a blog post is because among all of that craziness, I’m working really, really hard to disconnect more often and for longer periods of time and just be living in the quiet moment of Now. So, the kids and I have been playing pretend games together and Scott and I have enjoyed time together with some new favorite shows and even a game or two. I sometimes get so stuck on what I should be doing; who I should be helping; what I should be planning… that I forget about me and about Scott, Zack and Addie. No more of that nonsense. It’s all about balance.

So here we are.

I woke up a few days ago and just felt like we were on the cusp of something huge; something much greater than just a new year or a new month. We have spent so much of the past year transitioning from one home to another, one job to another, one lifestyle to another, that I finally feel as though we are ready to just live it now. To just be where we are and not where we are going or where we were.

Life is such an amazing adventure. I just want to soak up every minute of my journey.

Zack and Addie are the most wonderful little humans I’ve ever known. I might be biased.

Addie is so quick and witty. She greeted me at 7 a.m. today by shouting “Open the door, please, it’s good morning!” And when I opened the door, she reached out with her hand, shook mine and said, “Glad to meet you, Momma.”

She just continuously makes me laugh. More than four months after moving in to our home, she still asks her grandparents and random strangers if they want to come see her new room.

Her imagination is insane. She jumps from princesses in peril to babies and towers and hammering things that need fixed all within about 20 minutes. And there is so much drama! She knows how to work a pouty lip and lower her eyes and glance up at you through her dark eyelashes. You can’t not smile, I guarantee it.

We had some trouble with her stubbornness and strong disposition, but now we are getting a better handle on how to make her want to be a good girl instead of just going into discipline-the-bad-girl mode. She is relatively quick to clean up her toys, many times without me even asking, and she’s even more tolerant about sharing and brother hugs.

I love her quiet moments so very much.

The other day, I think we both wanted and needed some cuddly time together, so I suggested we watch a show under the blankets together while Zack was at school. I suggested princess movies and Bubble Guppies and even Dr. Seuss.

“No, momma,” She said. “I want to watch Momma’s show.”

I didn’t think it would last, but I gave it a try and flipped on the last 20 minutes of a terribly cheesy movie I watch on repeat whenever I get 20 minutes to catch my breath or eat a snack. She watched it all with me and held my hand tight. Near the end, she pointed to the lead female character, in a slightly sad scene, and told me that it was Momma.

But then quickly, she turned to look at me, put my face in her hands and said, “But Momma is happy because Addie makes Momma happy.”

She’s correct.

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And the Z-Man. Oh, how he is growing in so many ways in these recent weeks.

We are moving forward with getting him an aide for school and at home (about 14 hours/week total to start) and as long as the Commonwealth approves it, he’ll have someone by his side within the next two weeks. HIs most recent IEP meeting to discuss our plan for him for the next year, went well, all things considered.

It’s never easy to read a booklet on the most minute details of your firstborn. It’s never an enjoyable experience to hear things like “lifetime of needing special assistance” and “safety issues to himself” or words like “delay” and “lacking.” It doesn’t matter that we’ve done these types of meetings numerous times. It doesn’t matter that we are always grateful for them and for the handful of people in the room who care so much about Zack that it’s almost like he’s theirs, too. For me, it’s always like a rehashing of his Down Syndrome diagnosis. I grieve for a day or two, and then, we’re all OK. And I begin moving a thousand miles an hour to work on new ideas and areas of concentration. We’re asking a lot of “wh” questions (What color is that? Where is this?) to work on speech and we’ve got a lot of work to do to keep him attending to tasks without disrupting others or posing a safety concern to himself. But we have plans and we have dreams and they are all big and we are so excited.

Zack’s teacher spoke of his potential and she did it in such a proud way that I think “potential” is my current favorite word. Isn’t it exhilarating what power ‘potential’ has? You can do amazing things and be amazing. You can work to reach your potential because no one’s potential is just handed to them. Potential is a beautiful thing.

Zack has a good friend at school named Maggie. She’s a very quiet, shy girl who doesn’t typically like to be touched or disrupted, especially if she’s feeling a little anxiety. But for whatever reason, Zack can approach Maggie in any situation and hug her or hold her hand and she always lets him. This morning, it was just Zack and Maggie on the van to school. When we opened the door and he saw her, Zack just smiled and kept saying her name over and over like a song. Before I closed the door, I saw they were already holding hands.

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So here’s to more blogs. And to potential. And to holding hands and making people happy. Because that’s right where we are now.

Snippets — On “new”

There’s a lot of “new” among us nowadays.
We spent a lot of time in our “old” planning for this New but really, we had no idea and yes, yes it was worth every minute of excruciating, stressful waiting.

Here’s a peek.

On Our Home
I love this place.
I could end the blurb right there, but let me tell you — I love it so much and for a thousand reasons.
This place is our home already, not just a house. I have such a large kitchen that I am constantly feeling like I get a workout walking from the stove to the sink and back to the stove. It’s just a terrible problem to have, geesh. But seriously, it’s exciting to cook dinners here and bake desserts. It’s the location of our back door, so the hubby walks through it every night just as the kids are getting on my last tiny, itty-bitty nerve and only milliseconds after I have somehow managed to put the house back together again after we’ve spent all day tearing it apart together.

I have my own (giant) laundry room with two brand-new appliances that sing songs when they’re done with a cycle and calculate via a little Robot Dance how dirty those clothes really are — it’s the little things, I tell you.

When I was in the house those first few days cleaning and prepping for boxes and furniture, I CONSTANTLY got lost upstairs. No, seriously. I would walk out of Addie’s room and turn left when I should turn right. And at least twice I nearly toppled down the stairs after a wrong turn.

So what that both bathrooms are set up in such a way that you have to sit sideways on the toilet when you pee so your knees don’t hit radiators — we have two full bathrooms!

I have an office to work out of, even if it’s become the last room to unpack. I may or may not be typing this with my feet propped up on a box of Mary Kay products.

Since Zack has begun school, Addie and I have started a routine of waiting for his bus on our enclosed front porch. I sip my coffee or guzzle some water, she reads her Elmo book in her Dora chair and a light breeze comes through the windows as I gaze about our street, taking in the neighbors and cars and houses and all that.

I even like our tiny yard and am grateful for the tiny amount of time it takes to mow now — and am so, so grateful there are no hills or steep slopes. I am planning next year’s herb garden and am on the hunt for some Autumn mums for our front.

There are New House cards on the counter, a new welcome mat with our last name leading out to the front porch and new coffee K-cups in the cupboard. Thanks, y’all.

Pat the Neighbor

On the night of our official move in to the house, we thought our cat Rocky got out of the house somehow. I was so upset and was trying so hard to not let it put a damper on such a special day. Scott and dog Izzie and I finally took off on a dusk walk around the neighborhood. About three houses up the one street, and a pleasant middle-aged, hard-working-and-you-can-tell-by-looking-at-him man named Pat introduced himself to us, helped look for the cat (which turned up inside the house, hmrph!) and spent several minutes talking to Scott about the neighborhood and neighbors and his time (35-plus years) here.
A night or two later while returning from the nearby park with the kids and there was Pat, waving to us and saying hello to us by name.
I was struggling with an old-school push mower my Dad gave us the other afternoon and Pat came out in his Steelers jersey, shook his head and wheeled his personal mower down to me.
“This will be easier,” he said. “Game’s on; I gotta go.”

For being only a few miles down the highway from Wilkes-Barre, a relatively large city in Northeastern PA, we feel like we are in quiet suburbia. Dogs are walked and kids go to the park and bicycles whizz past the house and the mailman walks down the street and makes sure your front door is latched every time she drops off a package. It’s relatively quiet and our location is incredibly convenient. We’ve discovered a handful of parks and attractions and events and are so excited to continue our exploration of the area.

Zack’s (second) First Day and Addie’s Still Crazy
Z-Man started at his new school this week and of course, did not disappoint with his adaptability and strength. He gets picked up in front of the house in a van with anywhere from four to eight other kids already on board and gets whisked away to his school, only a five-minute drive from our house. His school is a reverse inclusion classroom-type program (half special needs children and half “typical” children) and is the perfect blend of the two programs he was in last year. There are therapists on site, a new sensory program, focus on his IEP and a foundation based off of Montessori teachings.
On his second day, he grabbed his backpack on the front porch and said, “Momma, school bus!” and we marched to the white vehicle. I opened the door and he hugged my legs for just a few seconds, looked up at me with a smile and hopped inside with his friends. When he came home, I asked how school was and he kept saying the words “happy” and “friends.”

His time at school gives me and Addie some “Girl Time” and I am enjoying that, too. She’s talking so much and coming up with the most hysterical comebacks and responses. She just keeps me laughing so much of the time. And shaking my head.

We can’t keep her hair looking good for the life of us. She’s always rolling and running and braids fall out and ponytails sink down and bangs are constantly in her face. She makes a face when I put her in a dress and yet sprints to the nearest person and says, “Look, ___, Addie so pretty!”

She requests “Elmo” (Sesame Street) almost daily now, and happy to relive my childhood, happily DVR episodes for her. Every time, she points at the TV during the credits and yells “Where Elmo go?” even though she knows very well he rides in on his tricycle about ten seconds later.

She has become our pickier eater, or perhaps Zack has just started eating so much more now, but either way, dinner is always an adventure.

Him
I’m more in love with my Scott when he’s in his Daddy Zone than any other time or place or circumstance.
He walks in the door from work and I basically shoo him into the living room to play with the kiddos. They are instantly all over him, giving hugs, offering “teapot” (Addie’s version of a tea party) and requesting books to read and wrestling together.
But it’s his bedtime rituals with the kiddos I adore most.
Last night, I hovered around a corner in the hallway, two sippie cups and two diapers in my hands, frozen. I had been coming out of the laundry room when I heard him in Addie’s room, doing a role call of all of her animals.
“And who’s this?,” he asks her.
With a giggle, she tells him.
They go back and forth like this through all eight or nine creatures.
He does this to make her feel comfortable and to let her know she is surrounded by love as she goes to sleep. But she doesn’t need any of the Guppies or the bear or even the puppy blanket. Her Daddy showers her (and Zack) with love.

Scott and I are better than ever. It’s back to basics.
Hand holding and driving adventures and silly jokes and showing the other person you care.
He’s been patient with my need-this-for-the-house list and has put up shelves, hooked up electronics and nearly singlehandedly moved large furniture.

I’m happy for where we are, literally but also this very figurative place, too.

We are in a happy place that needs no address.